Yesterday, Tim asked, “How do we get to the place where we walk by faith and not by sight?”

Allow me to offer a suggestion: deep spiritual change necessitates we learn to pivot.

Yes, pivot.

You thought I was going to say pray, worship, or be in a small group, didn’t you? All of these are necessary components of a grace-filled Christ follower’s life. If change is on the horizon (hint, hint: it is!) embracing the spiritual practices are not only necessary, they are essential to our daily and weekly rhythms.

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When we seek deep spiritual change in our lives, there is always God’s invitation to walk by faith, not by sight. In Matthew’s gospel, Jesus say’s, “But strive first for the kingdom of God and God’s righteousness and all these things will be given to you as well” (Matthew 6:33).

Deep spiritual change is what is needed to lead the church today into the future.  So, why do so many of us hesitate to embrace deep spiritual change?

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Are you and your church dying a slow death?  Dick Wills, in Waking To God’s Dream, sees only two options for the church today: deep spiritual change or slow death. He writes, “One might think that if a church has indigenous worship, small groups, and empowerment of the laity, it will certainly be a vital community of faith.  But there is a problem. The fundamental need is for the pastor to be a “spiritual leader.”¹

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Henri Nouwen, in his book The Genesee Diary, wrote, “He who thinks that he is finished is finished. How true. Those who think that they have arrived, have lost their way. Those who think they have reached their goal, have missed it. Those who think they are saints; are demons.”

As I have reflected upon Nouwen’s words, I have come to the conclusion that God is not finished with any of us. For you and me to be the people God intends for us to be, we must come to the place in our lives where we admit we are unfinished.

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A Call to Release People for Incarnational Ministry

I think the church is stuck.

We are stuck in a model of church that is based on attracting people to programs. To complicate matters even more, we often hire staff to plan and implement ministry programs but fail to equip the whole people of God for the work of ministry.

Before you click away from this page because I’ve touched a nerve, please allow me to explain.

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I celebrate a birthday this week (Editor’s note: Tim’s birthday is today, April 6). As I often do, I took an assessment of my life and ministry. Although I am generally pleased with my life, I decided I must be more focused if I am to make the difference in the world I believe God created me to make.  I realized that I have a few years of active ministry left in and through the United Methodist Church (10 years before I have to retire). I believe I must be more clearly focused if I am to make that difference.

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Look at the activity of your life and consider all the things you do or do not do. Consider all the things you feel you should do or should not do. Ask yourself, “Of all of these, what really matters? What truly makes a difference in who I am or who I am becoming?

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After the resurrection of Jesus Christ, the disciples saw themselves as the “evidence” of the resurrection. They started a movement that continues over 2000 years later. Their words, actions, and interactions with people were evidence the resurrection was real, powerful, and hope-filled. Today, their witness is animated through your life.

How can your life be evidence of the resurrection?

Yes, it is possible!

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Kirk Byron Jones, author of The Jazz of Preaching and editor of The African-American Preaching Library writes:

“Handling the resurrection is challenging; being handled by the resurrection is even more challenging.  In Alaine Alsire’s novel, Lazarus’ problem was not being raised; his problem was being raised ‘different.’ He was not the same person. Christian resurrection is not just about coming back to life, but coming back to life ‘different.’  We don’t do different well. In social relations, all too often we interpret different as deficient…

Being handled by the resurrection means constantly challenging our fear of the unknown, and even more…constantly challenging our fear ‘of the loss of the known.’  Being handled by the resurrection means learning to relax in the experience of new life. May we enter with God into the work of changing and recomposing our lives.  May we rise and cheer such resurrections.”

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My first appointment out of seminary was at Humphreys Memorial United Methodist Church located on the Coal River in a small West Virginia town. Being the third in a succession of new, young seminary graduates to become the pastor of the congregation, the people of the church knew how to make a young family welcome. My wife, Kim, our four-month-old son, Evan, and I were immediately taken in as family members.

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