Will the local church you lead emerge stronger or weaker on the other side of the COVID-19 pandemic?

That’s a big question!

Here’s the currency – and no we’re not talking money – that is going to determine the answer to that question: trust.

Trust is the foundation of all healthy teams and organizations, including the church. Before we explore the components of trust, consider for a minute, the relationship between a pastor and the church leadership.  What stage is your leadership team at in building trust?

  • Ground Zero – You’re just beginning to build trust
  • Emerging Trust – You have some trust, but it needs to improve.
  • Expanding Trust – You’ve tested your trust and are looking to grow deeper

Here’s your first reminder: don’t over-react or discount where you find yourself.

Are you doing the best you can? Great! Keep going.

Building Trust in Small Moments

Wherever you find yourself, building trust is not a “one and done” adventure. Trust is built in small moments. Think of trust being built over time as a series of experiences – small, seemingly mundane moments.

Yes, momentous occasions can build trust.

The challenge is, even during an extended crisis, those “big moments” are not frequent. Small moments, like making a phone call, sending a note, asking how someone is doing…and stopped to listen to their answer, etc. are the fabric of daily relationships. These are seemingly small moments AND these are the moments that build trust. As you consider all that is happening right now, take a minute to celebrate the small moments that are deepening your relationships with others. Why? Because you’re building trust!

Defining Trust and Identifying Stakeholders

Additionally, trust is multi-faceted.

Before you consider the groups entrusted to your care, here’s the definition of trust we’re working with: 

  • Trust is choosing to risk making something you value vulnerable to another person’s actions. Vulnerability is “the emotion you experience during times of uncertainty risk, and emotional exposure.”
  • Distrust is the choice not to make self vulnerable to another person’s actions.

With these definitions in mind, now consider the church you lead and/or attend. Across an organization, leaders need to build trust with multiple groups, or stakeholders.

The starting point of trust in the local church are our relationships with Jesus. If I may ask you another question, how are you doing trusting Jesus in this season of ministry? As a person of faith, it could go without saying, your relationship with Jesus sets the direction for trust across other relationships. But, I’ve made this assumption before only to be surprised when it wasn’t the case. 

With your trust in Jesus firmly in place, now consider these six unique groups that necessitate trust in local congregations.

Each one is important. Each one takes effort to nurture and care. This is not an exhaustive list. It’s a macro list to help you begin considering your relationships. Some of the relationships on this list likely need to be nurtured. Other relationships, I hope, are reasons to celebrate how you’ve nurtured trust over time.

Consider these groups and add to the list to make it your own.

  1. Pastor(s)
  2. Community
  3. Congregation
  4. Church leaders
  5. District and conference leadership
  6. Staff (where applicable)

Pause and watch a conversation Tim and I had about this topic.

Why trust is important during this pandemic

Why do we say trust is what will determine whether the church you lead is stronger or weaker on the other side of this pandemic? Because, if you watched the video, you heard us identify the thoughts, feelings, and actions associated with trust. These are the things that keep you nimble, open to God’s presence, and to the changing circumstances around you. 

Here’s the good news: You get to determine how you’ll lead people through this crisis. You have the agency to lead people to build trust and be a community that develops trust. What might happen if you focused on the foundational element of all teams?

We’re here to help you find out.

Trust is the foundation upon which every team is built. The challenge is, most teams don’t intentionally focus on building trust.

During seasons of rapid change and uncertainty, trust is absolutely essential. We’re prepared to help you build trust with simple, yet effective, 45 to 60-minute conversations.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Click the button below to complete a simple form.
  2. You’ll get an email with information about three stages of trust.
  3. Reply to the email as instructed.
  4. We’ll contact you to schedule your next steps.
2 replies
  1. Christine Bean
    Christine Bean says:

    I began the pandemic with a staph infection that was keeping me isolated at home already. Since my husband’s death, finances have been strained and I was considering things that “need” to be done around the house and daydreaming about what I would do if I had the money. The pandemic gave me the assurance that there was almost no possibility of getting money and who knew what was going to happen to my leg. With these negative thoughts I came to the realization that I had absolutely no control over either of these things, but that God was taking care of my needs. I know that I trust Him for the outcome. I also was aware that the outcome might not be what I was wanting, but I still trust Him. If the outcome is not what I want, it is still the outcome God considers best for His will under the circumstances we may have given Him. My present pastor continues to point me toward God, and he checks on me by phone as often as he can.

    Reply

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